May 7, 2015 in Blog

Giant Galapagos Tortoises

Giant Tortoises were decimated in the Galapagos Islands over the last two centuries— scientists estimate only 10% of the original population remains, after overexploitation by 19th century whalers, and non-native, invasive predators. The Galapagos Conservancy is in the midst of their Giant Tortoise Restoration Initiative (GTRI), in collaboration with the Galapagos National Park Directorate, working to restore their numbers through breeding programs, returning tortoises to islands where they are extinct, and improving their habitats to ensure their success.

With no settlements, postal service or stores, the team of scientists and researchers needs to bring all their necessities on and off the uninhabited islands with them. That means all their food, supplies, tools and equipment must be brought in by ship, handed off to dinghies and carried to shore manually.

Dinghy to shore

Dr. Linda Cayot, Science Advisor to the Galapagos Conservancy and supervisor of the GTRI, let us know ZARGES cases are her team’s preferred choice for the rugged environs of the Galapagos, and have been for the last 20 years.

Offering up to IP 67 protection, ZARGES cases are up to the challenges posed by the rugged environment. Water tight and dust-proof seals, secure latches, and lightweight aluminum construction, resistant to the corrosive qualities of salt water, combine to provide Dr. Cayot and her team the protection and strength their mission requires.

Camp in Galapagos

We are proud to be a part of this important work, and wish Dr. Cayot, her colleagues Wacho Tapia MSc, Dr. James Gibbs, and their entire crew success with this important project. The Giant Tortoises are essential to the ecosystem of the Galapagos, and restoring their habitat and population is vitally important. We encourage you to support their efforts by visiting their website and contributing to their goals.

(all images courtesy Dr. Linda Cayot and The Galapagos Conservancy)